The Tales of Beedle the Bard by J.K. Rowling

The Tales of Beedle the Bard by J.K. Rowling

These tales are known for the part they play in Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows. After the success of the book, J. K. Rowling decided to write them all down! Please read on for my review of 

The Tales of Beedle The Bard

It is supposedly a book with children’s stories, written by Beedle the Bard, with notes from Albus Dumbledore.

But after reading those stories, I can tell you that not all are suitable for children. Nonetheless, they are very educating, reminding of me Aesop’s fables. Some of them may be suitable for younger ages, too. Having grown up with those classics, it was a very nice change reading well worked stories.

It is a very interesting addition to the Harry Potter Universe, that takes us back to small moments of magic.

The heroes and heroines who triumph in his stories are not those with the most powerful magic, but rather those who demonstrate the most kindness, common sense and ingenuity.

The Tales of Beedle the Bard by J.K. Rowling

Title: The Tales of Beedle the Bard
Author: J.K. Rowling
Genre: Fantasy / Magical Elements, Young Adult
Published by: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1338125680
Published on: 4 December, 2008
Format:Hardcover
Source: Self-Purchased
Pages: 128
Rated: five-stars
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The Tales of Beedle the Bard, a Wizarding classic, first came to Muggle readers’ attention in the book known as Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Now, thanks to Hermione Granger’s new translation from the ancient runes, we present this stunning edition with an introduction, notes, and illustrations by J. K. Rowling, and extensive commentary by Albus Dumbledore.

Never before have Muggles been privy to these richly imaginative tales: “The Wizard and the Hopping Pot,” “The Fountain of Fair Fortune,” “The Warlock’s Hairy Heart,” “Babbitty Rabbitty and Her Cackling Stump,” and of course, “The Tale of the Three Brothers.” But not only are they the equal of fairy tales we now know and love, reading them gives new insight into the world of Harry Potter.

About J.K. Rowling

Joanne Rowling was born in July 1965 at Yate General Hospital in England and grew up in Chepstow, Gwent where she went to Wyedean Comprehensive. Although she writes under the pen name J.K. Rowling, pronounced like rolling, her name when her first Harry Potter book was published was simply Joanne Rowling. Anticipating that the target audience of young boys might not want to read a book written by a woman, her publishers demanded that she use two initials, rather than her full name. As she had no middle name, she chose K as the second initial of her pen name, from her paternal grandmother Kathleen Ada Bulgen Rowling

As well as an OBE for services to children’s literature, J.K. Rowling is the recipient of numerous awards and honorary degrees including the Prince of Asturias Award for Concord, France’s Légion d’Honneur, and the Hans Christian Andersen Literature Award, and she has been a Commencement Speaker at Harvard University USA. She supports a wide number of charitable causes through her charitable trust Volant, and is the founder of Lumos, a charity working to transform the lives of disadvantaged children.

In 2012, J.K. Rowling published her first novel for adults, The Casual Vacancy (Little Brown), which has now been published in 44 languages.

J.K. Rowling has also written The Cuckoo's Calling (Little Brown), her first crime novel under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith, which was published in 2013 and is to be translated into 37 languages.   A second Robert Galbraith novel is due to be published in 2014.

 

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