AudioBook Review: The Education of Miss Patterson by Marion Chesney

AudioBook Review:

Like all of Marion Chesney/M.C. Beaton’s romance titles, they are short, sweet and fun, with a touch of a retro feel: most were penned twenty years ago, and even with the historical romances you do notice the age on some of these titles.  That is not, however, a bad thing: you know what you are getting, they are fun and light with a very British feel in both style and delivery.

In this story, Patricia Patterson is youthful and exuberant, more than a little spoiled and in charge of her own life after the death of her parents. Her guardian has not appeared to rein in her fun, tell her what to do, or lay the conventional expectations of society on her shoulders.  Scandalous, certainly, but she is strong willed and coddled, used to having her own way without often being told no.  Not much time expires before a stranger appears in the form of Lord Charles Gaunt, claiming his position as her guardian.  Lord Charles is uptight and hemmed in: critical of Patricia’s attitude and behavior as well as the few extra pounds she carries.  Instantly hiring a governess/tutor and seeking Patricia’s acquiescence and tractability: he was not prepared for her rebellion. Unwilling to allow her rebellious behavior to cause scandal, Lord Charles ships her off to Boston to be “finished”.  This could have ended the story, or it could have resulted in a story about a school, but instead we find Patricia returning after plotting for her two years to gain an advantage.

She returns, and decides that she will cause the unflappable Lord Charles several moments of discomfort as she seeks to make him hers.   Yes, the secondary characters are close to stereotypical villains, but they are truly only serving as background and to add some conflict before our couple is reunited to get to their happy ending.

Narration provided by Alison Larkin was perfectly suited to this story, giving appropriate attention to the inflections and pacing to illustrate character differences, presenting strength and stubbornness in equal balance for Lord Charles, adding a touch of stomping two year old to the early renditions of Patricia and bringing us a more cultured and coy young woman upon her return.  This was a fun, sweet and short romance that isn’t going to challenge but will charm.

Stars:  Overall:  4  Narration:  4  Story: 4 

AudioBook Review: The Education of Miss Patterson by Marion Chesney

Title: The Education of Miss Patterson
Author: Marion Chesney
Narrator: Alison Larkin
Published by: AudioGo
Format:Audiobook
Source: AudioBook Jukebox
Pages: 126
Audio Length: 4 Hours: 55 minutes
Rated: four-stars
Get Your Copy: Amazon AllRomance
See this Title on Goodreads

For lovely young Miss Patricia Patterson, life seemed a delightful dream--until the specter of her guardian, Lord Charles Gaunt, cast a shadow over her carefree days of idleness and enchanting evenings of dazzling balls and delicious flirtations. Lord Charles demanded she act the part of a proper and perfectly boring young Miss. Even worse, he insisted she devote her waking hours to cultivating her mind rather than captivating her swarm of admirers. Thus theFor lovely young Miss Patricia Patterson, life seemed a delightful dream--until the specter of her guardian, Lord Charles Gaunt, cast a shadow over her carefree days of idleness and enchanting evenings of dazzling balls and delicious flirtations. Lord Charles demanded she act the part of a proper and perfectly boring young Miss. Even worse, he insisted she devote her waking hours to cultivating her mind rather than captivating her swarm of admirers. Thus the battle was joined--between the handsome, arrogant aristocrat who had Patricia in his lawful power, and Patricia, who vowed to turn this hateful tyrant into her lovelorn slave. . . .

A copy of this title was provided via AudioBook Jukebox for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility.

About Marion Chesney

Marion Chesney was born on 1936 in Glasgow, Scotland, UK, and started her first job as a bookseller in charge of the fiction department in John Smith & Sons Ltd. While bookselling, by chance, she got an offer from the Scottish Daily Mail to review variety shows and quickly rose to be their theatre critic. She left Smith’s to join Scottish Field magazine as a secretary in the advertising department, without any shorthand or typing, but quickly got the job of fashion editor instead. She then moved to the Scottish Daily Express where she reported mostly on crime. This was followed by a move to Fleet Street to the Daily Express where she became chief woman reporter. After marrying Harry Scott Gibbons and having a son, Charles, Marion went to the United States where Harry had been offered the job of editor of the Oyster Bay Guardian. When that didn’t work out, they went to Virginia and Marion worked as a waitress in a greasy spoon on the Jefferson Davies in Alexandria while Harry washed the dishes. Both then got jobs on Rupert Murdoch’s new tabloid, The Star, and moved to New York.

Anxious to spend more time at home with her small son, Marion, urged by her husband, started to write historical romances in 1977. After she had written over 100 of them under her maiden name, Marion Chesney, and under the pseudonyms: Ann Fairfax, Jennie Tremaine, Helen Crampton, Charlotte Ward, and Sarah Chester, she getting fed up with 1714 to 1910, she began to write detectives stories in 1985 under the pseudonym of M. C. Beaton. On a trip from the States to Sutherland on holiday, a course at a fishing school inspired the first Constable Hamish Macbeth story. They returned to Britain and bought a croft house and croft in Sutherland where Harry reared a flock of black sheep. But Charles was at school, in London so when he finished and both tired of the long commute to the north of Scotland, they moved to the Cotswolds where Agatha Raisin was created.

While Marion wrote her historical romances under her maiden name, Marion Chesney, as well as several pseudonyms (Helen Crampton, Ann Fairfax, Jennie Tremaine, and Charlotte Ward), because of her great success with mystery novels as M. C. Beaton, most of her publishers both in the U.S. and abroad use the M. C. Beaton pseudonym for all of her novels.