Armchair BEA 2015 – Book to Movie Adaption with Giveaway!

Armchair BEA 2015 - Book to Movie Adaption with Giveaway!

Welcome to day four of the ArmchairBEA 2015 on line conference! You can see all of my previous posts HERE, and you can find an agenda/links to the other bloggers participating in this conference by going to Armchair BEA.

Today’s topic is Book to Movie Adaptions.  Everyone has an opinion and today I’ll share mine.

Part of the reason that I don’t always jump on adaptions of books that I have read and enjoyed is the inability for the movie to have the same ‘feel’ for me.  It also is the reason that I don’t gravitate to books written by those who are educated in script or play writing.  I have experience and imagination, I don’t want to be micromanaged in how the apple looks on the table, or the look of a sunset.  See, the difference between writing fiction to read versus writing for a performed piece where the visual references must be highly specific leaves me, the reader, out of the process. The read then becomes a passive one, with the overload of visual references and information quickly overwhelming and removing the enjoyment.

But, there are some adaptions that work. IF you are careful to remember that usually the process of adaption means that the ‘essence’ of the work is being presented, and since the director and producers are trying to broaden the appeal beyond those readers who know the story; elements that build characters, small subplots and quiet moments are often passed over in favor of drama, action and visually arresting moments.  As a reader and watcher, you have to be able to separate the two visions (yours of the book and that of the director and editor) to find the essence.

Unfortunately, not every producer or director works for nuance: FSOG movie was horrible and flat, with the ‘appeal’ in the shock value (which really wasn’t).  To be fair – I read only a few pages of the book before giving up -it bored me, it was unrealistic and trite, and frankly I wasn’t impressed. Other adaptions went to the ‘serial’ form, most notable is Gabaldon’s Outlander and Martin’s Game of Thrones.

Both of these adaptions, using a series of storylines, multiple episodes and pulling tension from action and the cutting of the scenes give readers a solid sense of the books.  Outlander has remained the ‘truest’ to the books, but there are differences – still, the story holds in both forms. There is the majesty and mystery of the Highlands, the love that radiates from Jamie and Claire and the menace that is Black Jack.  A good mix of character and action move the story forward, and it doesn’t hurt that the series touches on key moments of dialogue, danger and relationship that were highlights of the book.  Game of Thrones is a bit different, but no less enjoyable.  An epic fantasy, GOT books are laden with characters that take off in different directions, with agendas and double-dealing, action, death, plotting and failures. The producers and writers have set the groundwork that is different yet ‘fits’ with the books, giving them a venue to take the series off in another direction, while giving those unfamiliar with the books a sense of the ‘players’ and the events that could come, even as they are branching from the plotting of the books this season.

As a reader of BOTH series, I’m willing to watch each story as if I know the characters, but there are secrets they haven’t shared with me yet.  The television series gives me an opportunity to revisit the stories I read long ago, and give me yet another look into the world: to see what another reader (for you must read the book to write the adaption) found important to the story. That little perspective tweak brings me a new view on elements of the books that I, as a reader, may not have seen or focused upon: it can change the enjoyment and perception of the whole book.  So, there are bonus moments.

What are your favorite book to move adaptions?  What are must sees for me?

Giveaway

 

 

Now – to the Giveaway.   This will be open to US entrants Only (Sorry-but postage is a killer)
I’m giving away paperback copies of titles that have been adapted – and there are seven titles  in this giveaway – so you’ll want to check it out.  Titles to be given away are:

 

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

The Fault in Our Stars by John Greene

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

If I Were You by Lisa Renee Jones  (in development for television)

The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak

Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

 

You must be a US resident to enter, and be able to provide a US mailing address. Books will be MAILED via USPS and will contain some additional ‘swag’ items that include post it notes, bookmarks, keychains, cover flats and a tote bag.  Enter via the giveaway tool below.  Drawing will end on June 7 and winner will be notified on June 8.

 

Welcome to day four of the ArmchairBEA 2015 on line conference! You can see all of my previous posts HERE, and you can find an agenda/links to the other bloggers participating in this conference by going to Armchair BEA.
Today’s topic is Book to Movie Adaptions. Everyone has an opinion and today I’ll share mine.

Part of the reason that I don’t always jump on adaptions of books that I have read and enjoyed is the inability for the movie to have the same ‘feel’ for me. It also is the reason that I don’t gravitate to books written by those who are educated in script or play writing. I have experience and imagination, I don’t want to be micromanaged in how the apple looks on the table, or the look of a sunset. See, the difference between writing fiction to read versus writing for a performed piece where the visual references must be highly specific leaves me, the reader, out of the process. The read then becomes a passive one, with the overload of visual references and information quickly overwhelming and removing the enjoyment.

But, there are some adaptions that work. IF you are careful to remember that usually the process of adaption means that the ‘essence’ of the work is being presented, and since the director and producers are trying to broaden the appeal beyond those readers who know the story; elements that build characters, small subplots and quiet moments are often passed over in favor of drama, action and visually arresting moments. As a reader and watcher, you have to be able to separate the two visions (yours of the book and that of the director and editor) to find the essence.

Unfortunately, not every producer or director works for nuance: FSOG movie was horrible and flat, with the ‘appeal’ in the shock value (which really wasn’t). To be fair – I read only a few pages of the book before giving up -it bored me, it was unrealistic and trite, and frankly I wasn’t impressed. Other adaptions went to the ‘serial’ form, most notable is Gabaldon’s Outlander and Martin’s Game of Thrones.

Both of these adaptions, using a series of storylines, multiple episodes and pulling tension from action and the cutting of the scenes give readers a solid sense of the books. Outlander has remained the ‘truest’ to the books, but there are differences – still, the story holds in both forms. There is the majesty and mystery of the Highlands, the love that radiates from Jamie and Claire and the menace that is Black Jack. A good mix of character and action move the story forward, and it doesn’t hurt that the series touches on key moments of dialogue, danger and relationship that were highlights of the book. Game of Thrones is a bit different, but no less enjoyable. An epic fantasy, GOT books are laden with characters that take off in different directions, with agendas and double-dealing, action, death, plotting and failures. The producers and writers have set the groundwork that is different yet ‘fits’ with the books, giving them a venue to take the series off in another direction, while giving those unfamiliar with the books a sense of the ‘players’ and the events that could come, even as they are branching from the plotting of the books this season.

As a reader of BOTH series, I’m willing to watch each story as if I know the characters, but there are secrets they haven’t shared with me yet. The television series gives me an opportunity to revisit the stories I read long ago, and give me yet another look into the world: to see what another reader (for you must read the book to write the adaption) found important to the story. That little perspective tweak brings me a new view on elements of the books that I, as a reader, may not have seen or focused upon: it can change the enjoyment and perception of the whole book. So, there are bonus moments.

What are your favorite book to move adaptions? What are must sees for me?

Now – to the Giveaway. This will be open to US entrants Only (Sorry-but postage is a killer)
I’m giving away paperback copies of titles that have been adapted – and there are seven titles in this giveaway – so you’ll want to check it out. Titles to be given away are:

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
The Fault in Our Stars by John Greene
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
If I Were You by Lisa Renee Jones (in development for television)
The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

You must be a US resident to enter, and be able to provide a US mailing address. Books will be MAILED via USPS and will contain some additional ‘swag’ items that include post it notes, bookmarks, keychains, cover flats and a tote bag. Enter via the giveaway tool below. Drawing will end on June 7 and winner will be notified on June 8.
Welcome to day four of the ArmchairBEA 2015 on line conference! You can see all of my previous posts HERE, and you can find an agenda/links to the other bloggers participating in this conference by going to Armchair BEA.

Today’s topic is Book to Movie Adaptions. Everyone has an opinion and today I’ll share mine.

Part of the reason that I don’t always jump on adaptions of books that I have read and enjoyed is the inability for the movie to have the same ‘feel’ for me. It also is the reason that I don’t gravitate to books written by those who are educated in script or play writing. I have experience and imagination, I don’t want to be micromanaged in how the apple looks on the table, or the look of a sunset. See, the difference between writing fiction to read versus writing for a performed piece where the visual references must be highly specific leaves me, the reader, out of the process. The read then becomes a passive one, with the overload of visual references and information quickly overwhelming and removing the enjoyment.

But, there are some adaptions that work. IF you are careful to remember that usually the process of adaption means that the ‘essence’ of the work is being presented, and since the director and producers are trying to broaden the appeal beyond those readers who know the story; elements that build characters, small subplots and quiet moments are often passed over in favor of drama, action and visually arresting moments. As a reader and watcher, you have to be able to separate the two visions (yours of the book and that of the director and editor) to find the essence.

Unfortunately, not every producer or director works for nuance: FSOG movie was horrible and flat, with the ‘appeal’ in the shock value (which really wasn’t). To be fair – I read only a few pages of the book before giving up -it bored me, it was unrealistic and trite, and frankly I wasn’t impressed. Other adaptions went to the ‘serial’ form, most notable is Gabaldon’s Outlander and Martin’s Game of Thrones.

Both of these adaptions, using a series of storylines, multiple episodes and pulling tension from action and the cutting of the scenes give readers a solid sense of the books. Outlander has remained the ‘truest’ to the books, but there are differences – still, the story holds in both forms. There is the majesty and mystery of the Highlands, the love that radiates from Jamie and Claire and the menace that is Black Jack. A good mix of character and action move the story forward, and it doesn’t hurt that the series touches on key moments of dialogue, danger and relationship that were highlights of the book. Game of Thrones is a bit different, but no less enjoyable. An epic fantasy, GOT books are laden with characters that take off in different directions, with agendas and double-dealing, action, death, plotting and failures. The producers and writers have set the groundwork that is different yet ‘fits’ with the books, giving them a venue to take the series off in another direction, while giving those unfamiliar with the books a sense of the ‘players’ and the events that could come, even as they are branching from the plotting of the books this season.

As a reader of BOTH series, I’m willing to watch each story as if I know the characters, but there are secrets they haven’t shared with me yet. The television series gives me an opportunity to revisit the stories I read long ago, and give me yet another look into the world: to see what another reader (for you must read the book to write the adaption) found important to the story. That little perspective tweak brings me a new view on elements of the books that I, as a reader, may not have seen or focused upon: it can change the enjoyment and perception of the whole book. So, there are bonus moments.

What are your favorite book to move adaptions? What are must sees for me?

Now – to the Giveaway. This will be open to US entrants Only (Sorry-but postage is a killer)
I’m giving away paperback copies of titles that have been adapted – and there are seven titles in this giveaway – so you’ll want to check it out. Titles to be given away are:

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
The Fault in Our Stars by John Greene
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
If I Were You by Lisa Renee Jones (in development for television)
The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

You must be a US resident to enter, and be able to provide a US mailing address. Books will be MAILED via USPS and will contain some additional ‘swag’ items that include post it notes, bookmarks, keychains, cover flats and a tote bag. Enter via the giveaway tool below. Drawing will end on June 7 and winner will be notified on June 8.

 

 

Leave a Reply

CommentLuv badge

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.